Replacing the screen on a Microsoft Lumia 640 and similar

By YellowOnline on Friday 20 May 2016 23:32 - Comments (1)
Category: Hardware, Views: 3.164

The glass from the Lumias is pretty good. Mine is barely scratched (in the non-Black Knight meaning) after throwing a bit of a tantrum. Well, actually, after kicking it quite spectacularly 10 meters in the air and it rubbing the asphalt of the Kladow beach side glass-down for a dozen of meters, in one of my totally out of proportion bouts of anger. My taxi was canceled.

But enough about my personality issues: the glass survived wonderfully, but it did have one single scratch running from the left to the right of the screen. I'm not a hipster teenager who likes perforated jeans or shattered-screen iPhones, so I ordered a new screen from Hong Kong for about 25 and replaced my screen. A short manual for the Tweaker. I had a glance at this YouTube video before I ordered, so props to Smart Easy Repair and check it out if you prefer a video version.


Disclaimer
Don't blame me for screwing up (pun unintended) your warranty. Following these instructions is at your own risk.
I kept my original glass to be able to put it back in case I ever need to send it in.
]

ToolsInstructions

First, remove the back cover and the battery. If you need instructions for this, stop reading here and contact the nearest Tweaker.

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/lgCMmoWkoc65aVLLZXXptALR/full.jpg

Remove the screws from the side with the torx and keep them separately as they're slightly smaller than the other ones.

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/tDGN03j3Y8t4KC6qZUxbm66l/full.jpg

Remove all the visible screws from the back with the torx. There's also one screw you can't see because there's a thin layer over it that you can remove carefully.

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/8UeZRjogs7CEpLN7wxce98Ze/full.jpg

Now use a plastic tool to remove the frame from the rest of the phone. Be careful on the side where the connector is (cf. picture) so you don't accidentally damage it. I forgot about this and just pulled it off. Fortunately this type of connector doesn't need much to disconnect properly itself.

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/xTzr6ZjbcvSNCwAWADKL1vEC/full.jpg

So here we see the phone (L), the old screen (M) and the new screen (R).

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/WqYBoC3srzonGJRwMPp6bhfl/full.jpg

Remove the flexible cable. I just pulled it gently, although you might feel safer sliding a soft plastic tool under it.

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/3QlLSqm8yczFbhI10wMx35mB/full.jpg

I also removed the speaker because the new one didn't look very good.

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/BYu3YIxFgncte39xzCSdQwc2/full.jpg

Put everything where it belongs... this should be quite straight-forward...

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/6HzjbunMBj6PXojJmfbXTIih/full.jpg

... and reconnect the flexible cables. This can take between 3 seconds and 30 minutes, depending on how much feeling you have with these soft connectors :)

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/bai3BS2zjVwJm3Wz0MqxVICZ/full.jpg

Test 1-2 1-2 Test. Looks perfectly fine. Yes, there's still a plastic foil over it.

http://static.tweakers.net/ext/f/DkAj9mfKyDcD10zpKJ6hdFeA/full.jpg

As a last note: the biggest risk is buying a screen that is of an inferior quality. Take a good look at the sellers before you buy.

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Comments


By Tweakers user wolfero, Saturday 21 May 2016 12:12

Interesting! I have an old Lumia 630 and I now I feel like trying to repair the screen (which is broken), though my new phone is an android, but it is nice to have a spare phone :)

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